One is Fun: Cruising Solo

epic

Having been asked for advice about cruising solo, I thought I would take this opportunity to bring my thoughts together and post them here for you.  I have been solo on a cruise ship – P&O’s Azura in January 2013 when my OH wasn’t able to join me  – so I have some personal experience to reflect on here, plus tales from table companions and other friends made on board.

Things to consider about cruising solo

Firstly, you won’t be alone.  According to Douglas Ward, the author of the industry’s most used Berlitz Complete Guide to Cruising and Cruise Ships 2012, over 25% of all passengers are solo travellers.  Many ships have single cabins and add on rates for solo occupancy of double cabins.  Much like hotels, cruise ships base their rates on double occupancy, so you will find it more challenging to find deals.  Single cabins also sell fast, so be prepared to plan well in advance.

Strangely, you’ll be more likely to find a single cabin on an older or newer ship.  Fred Olsen’s older and smaller vessels are well geared to singles with a number of single cabins on each ship.  The newer and much larger Norwegian Epic has recognised the gap in the market, and has a particularly tailored set up (which I’ll tell you more about in a moment) for singles.  Similarly, P&O’s relatively recent-build Azura has a number of single cabins.

As is the case with all cruises, the first thing to consider is the kind of holiday you want.  Do you like to chill and watch the world go by, or are you constantly on the move and wanting to try new things?   Are you a culture vulture, a sun lover, or see no reason why you can’t be both?  Talk to your agent about what you really enjoy, and they’ll do their best to match you with the right ship for you.

studio

Norwegian Epic: Studio Cabin

My travel agent tips for cruising solo

  • Think about whether you would prefer a smaller ship, where you are likely to meet the same people regularly going about the ship, or a larger ship where there will be more to do, but it is less easy to meet people twice unless you arrange to do so.
  • Don’t be concerned about dining alone.  You will be seated each evening at a table where the ship will have done its best to link you up with like-minded souls.  I’ve met some lovely people through this arrangement, and have gone on to enjoy time with them outside of meals.
  • If you want to dine with others at lunch or breakfast, then go to the formal restaurant rather than the buffet.  You will automatically be seated with others and will have someone with whom to chat.
  • Check the daily newsletter carefully.  Some cruise lines operate get-together meetings for singles, particularly before port visits, so you can choose to explore together if you wish.
  • There are also plenty of activities on board where you don’t have to be paired up to have fun.  If you have an interest, go and learn to salsa/cook/craft or whatever else is offered.  A lot of couples who don’t share interests will go along as individuals, and it’s a great way to meet others who enjoy what you enjoy.
  • If you want to get to know people a little before you travel, join a cruise message board that offers a “roll call” for your voyage.   This is a great way to arrange to meet on ships, and potentially to do some shore excursions together.  Sometimes the group will have a get-together on board, or even the opportunity to do something special, like a backstage tour of the theatre or a trip to the bridge.

Some ships for solos

courtyard

Courtyard on the Norwegian Epic

Norwegian Cruise Line’s Norwegian Epic came into service in 2010, with space for 4,200 passengers.  The cruise line is seen as the originator of contemporary cruising, with a focus on “freestyle”, and sailings from the USA and European ports (no ex-UK sailings).  Dining choices are extensive.  Epic has 128 single cabins, called studios, which have decent sized beds and share a studio lounge where singles can meet for a coffee and arrange further meet-ups via the well-used notice board.  Epic’s entertainment is, well, epic, including major production shows, comedy, cabaret, and even the ability to rent a Gibson to play -via headphones – in your cabin.

theatre

Azura’s Theatre

P&O’s Azura is a family-friendly ship also brought into service in 2010.  She’s a large ship carrying 3096 passengers.  P&O is a traditionally British cruise line with a lot of sailings from the UK.  The cuisine is also traditionally British (with some rather good curries) and chargeable dining in Sindhu, Atol Kotchar’s restaurant at sea or Seventeen.  You’ll find 18 single cabins on Azura.  On board entertainment is offered in the Playhouse Theatre, the Manhattan lounge and Malabar, plus the Blue Bar and the Planet Bar, the latter having a video wall showing destinations.  Just the thing to distract a table of cruise travel agents at night!

dining

Black Watch – Dining with officers

Fred Olsen’s Black Watch first came into service in 1996 for Fred’s, although she originates from 1972.  She’s a mid-sized ship carrying 868 passengers, and she has 38 single cabins.  Black Watch is comfortable rather than luxurious, and is a very friendly ship.  With the size of the ship, it is easier to meet the same people again whilst on board. Entertainment is focused around the Neptune lounge, with production shows, and there are also a number of cabaret-style venues on board plus comfortable bars.

My final piece of advice: go enjoy!  Find the library or stock your Kindle for those moments of down time, and make the most of everything your holiday has to offer.

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2 thoughts on “One is Fun: Cruising Solo

  1. Only boat trip – Alaska Ferry – was alone, but was never alone. I was a travel agent for about…ten seconds, and I remember the owner telling me how to sell cruises. Said something about ships with Italian crews being for those who want a party atmosphere, and the Norwegian lines being more sedate…any thoughts on this? There’s that large city in Southern Italy where so many Italian crew members come from – the name escapes me, only the largest city in Southern Italy. Is any of this still true? You would know. Lot of good info here.
    Later…

  2. Still got to try that Alaska Ferry! I love ferries…spent a lot of time on the cross-channel variety in my childhood.

    Ships definitely did split along national lines on board but now crews seem to be becoming more multinational, so there’s less of a single prevailing culture. Even so, you’re still more likely to find Greek officers on Celebrity, and British on P&O and Cunard. It’s fun to match clients and ships though, as each ship has a very different vibe – and really important in getting people the kind of good time they want on their hols.

    As for the southern Italian city, are you thinking Gaeta? It’s a fishing and oil port and a NATO naval base.

    My best tip for crew spotting is to watch out for a) where the nearest free wifi is to be found – there will be off duty crew members loitering all around, tapping away, and b) where the crew members eat – good and cheap. (And if you dine nearby, you might well hear all kinds of funny ship gossip, even from other ships in port that day.)

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