Cruise Quirks: Captain’s Party

If you have been on more than one cruise with the same cruise line, you will undoubtedly have been invited to the Captain’s Party.  Designed as one of the loyalty rewards for repeat cruisers, the party normally falls at lunchtime on a sea day, and gives you the opportunity to eat, drink and make the acquaintance of the crew.

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Don’t worry – it wasn’t that quiet a party!  For some reason, we seemed to slip in a back door before many other people had arrived.  The party was hosted in a big lounge high on the ship, and it was pretty full.  Drinks on offer included a variety of cocktails and wine (I had sangria filled with some very finely chopped fruit…a bit odd between the teeth!) and there were a number of food stations set up including hand carved beef, sushi, and crepes suzettes.

There was some live music from the a capella group and the band, the Captain said a few words and presented a gift to the most-travelled cruiser on board, and there was much chatting with fellow passengers and crew.

Other “frequent flyer” rewards for cruise passengers include: free on board laundry, pressing and dry cleaning, free internet access, free speciality coffees and drinks, a separate lounge for breakfast, souvenir gifts, priority tendering and reservations at on board restaurants and special experiences such as backstage tours, tastings and the like.

Tune in next week, and I’ll tell you what it’s like to dine at the captain’s table.

Cruise Quirks: Gentleman Hosts

It has to be said that dance is an integral part of cruising.  From deck parties to Zumba for fitness, salsa lessons, demonstrations by professionals, and the night clubs on board or formal tea dances, there’s an opportunity each day to get your groove on.  After all, it’s a way of compensating for all that delicious food…

What you may not realise is that there are gentlemen (and a lady or two) out there working their passage through a role as a dance host.  We found out about this early in our cruising career, when a lovely table mate on the Queen Mary 2 enlightened us.  I had been watching what I considered to be some rather forward men during afternoon tea the day before.  Afternoon tea includes a session or two from the dance orchestra, and an opportunity to take to the floor.  The gentlemen involved were circling the tables and inviting many different women to join them.  I was torn between thinking them very cheeky and offering them a high five, until I found out about the role of the dance host.

On some cruise lines, including Cunard and Fred Olsen, dance hosts are available to provide opportunities to dance for those ladies who are single or have partners with more than one left foot.  On Fred Olsen’s Black Watch, I believe there is also a lady host for those gentlemen in a similar situation wishing to dance.  We learned lots about their role from our table companion on the Queen Mary 2.  Dance hosts must be good conversationalists, happy to chat away to passengers.  They should not monopolise a single guest, nor should they dance too close (!), and they must be prepared to dance for a significant number of hours each day – perhaps up to 6, which must keep you very fit indeed.  I gained a lot of respect for them; that’s quite some time on your swirling and cha-cha-ing feet.  With the popularity of StrictlCome Dancing and Dancing With The Stars, they must be kept very busy.

And it’s not just the more mature audiences who are loving the dancing on board.  We have seen lots of younger couples hitting the floor and impressing us with what might be dance school knowledge.  You can also learn to dance on the ship, with lessons covering everything from the samba to the foxtrot.  Celebrity Eclipse uses the big spaces on Deck 14 for its dance classes, giving you one of the best views ever while you’re learning.

So if you want to be a dance host, where do you start?  The all-encompassing Job Monkey states that:

Most hosts are retired single men who work for the chance to sail around the world for free, or sometimes for a small salary. Gentlemen hosts must know a variety of different dances, but ballroom, swing, waltz, fox trot, and other more formal dances are preferred. Hosts must be able to dance for several hours almost every night so it makes sense that gentleman hosts are social people with a lot of energy. They must also be good conversationalists and enjoy social engagements as well as some hosts are asked to attend parties and onboard events that do not involve dancing.

Read more: http://www.jobmonkey.com/cruise/html/gentleman_hosts.html#ixzz2NWRWk1Gt

Ann Brenoff at the Huffington Post interviewed one of the gentleman hosts, finding that his role was not short on romantic overtures from female guests.  She writes:

“According to Alan Benedict, 58 and a Gentlemen Host™ for 20 years, the rules of conduct are clear. The men dress “in uniform” — either a tuxedo or a blue blazer at all times (replete with name tags/badges) and no jeans are ever worn, even on shore excursions. They never dance with a woman who is traveling with a male companion/husband without express permission from him. And, says Benedict, they don’t focus on the younger women on board. “We are here for the 50+ women,” he said. Hosts also make sure that all the women understand that their role is to circulate and not pair off with just one.”

Read more: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/02/17/gentlemen-hosts_n_1260534.html

So if you are a dancing gentleman, why not consider seeing the world, keeping fit, and gathering a rich selection of experiences?

Cruise Quirks: Crossing the Equator Ceremony

From YouTube, here’s the crossing the equator ceremony on the Celebrity Millennium.  I didn’t realise that there were other clubs at sea to join.  The navy has a number of classifications:

  • Top Secret Shellbacks – for submariners having crossed the equator at a classified degree of longitude
  • The Order of the Blue Nose for crossing the Arctic Circle
  • The Order of the Red Nose for crossing the Antarctic Circle
  • The Order of the Golden Dragon for crossing the International Date Line
  • The Order of the Ditch for passing through the Panama Canal
  • The Order of the Rock for transiting the Strait of Gibraltar
  • The Safari to Suez for passing through the Suez Canal
  • The Golden Shellback for crossing the meeting point of the Equator and the International Date Line
  • The Emerald Shellback or Royal Diamond Shellback for sailors who cross at 0 degrees off the coast of West Africa, where the equator crosses the prime meridian
  • The Realm of the Czars for sailors who cross into the Black Sea
  • The Order of Magellan for circumnavigators
  • The Order of the Lakes for those who have sailed on all five Great Lakes

Cruise Quirks: How to make your towel penguin

One strange little quirk of cruise travel is the appearance of small beasts in your cabin.  Made from towels, sometimes supplemented by props from your stateroom, these animals appear randomly throughout the voyage.  If you’re feeling lonely without one, or want to entertain the kids on a dull Sunday afternoon, here’s how to add a travelling penguin to your household.